Tag Archives: health economics

The Business of Addiction… 9 Surprising Reasons U.S. healthcare costs the most, yet delivers the least (part 3)

Treating addiction has become a huge business. Rehabs that actually work translate into customers that don’t need to return and a lot less revenue. Addiction takes many forms, such as:

  • Alcohol dependency
  • Drug abuse
  • Clinging to toxic relationships
  • Overeating or compulsive dieting
  • Compulsively using electronics

Until healthcare professionals are trained to recognize functional addiction, and our healthcare system adopts an integrative approach that includes vocational rehabilitation, the cost of treatment and insurance will continue to rise.

Technically, there is no cure for addiction, because it leaves one with an eternal vulnerability toward succumbing yet once more. However, it is possible to figure out its triggers, dynamics, and underlying causes, and to develop routines, alternate coping mechanisms, and tools that make using unappealing and unacceptable…. Or not!

Spiritual disconnection
At its core, addiction is a spiritual disconnection. It is life destroying, not life affirming. It is self, not community.

Lack of sleep, the rapid pace of communication and change, less exposure to nature, less working with one’s hands, and economic uncertainty can contribute to this disconnection and serve as triggers.

Addiction, the subconscious saboteur
Addiction, “cunning, baffling, and powerful,” stunts emotional and spiritual growth. Sometimes, addicts have not learned how to detect, let alone feel, their feelings, and addiction enables them to avoid uncomfortable feelings. Addiction can also stem from the subconscious desire to self-destruct. And sometimes, addictions develop as an attempt to:

  • Soothe symptoms from mental illness, such as depression
  • Cope with processing challenges such as attention deficit disorder
  • Numb the effects or after effects of trauma
  • Deal with the hopelessness of chronic poverty

Pain and denial
Addiction feeds on pain. The addict subconsciously creates pain, so that he or she has a need to feed that pain, soothe that pain, with the addiction.

Addicts live in denial and rationalize their addiction so that they don’t have to let go of it. There is no logic with an addict, and circumstances or others are always at fault.

Author John Bradshaw on compulsivity
Where there is disconnection, there is compulsivity.

  • “The common root of every addiction is compulsivity understood as addictiveness.”
  • “Addictiveness is the inner emptiness we try to fill up with any mood-altering behavior.”
  • “Healing the unresolved grief resulting from abandonment is the way to heal compulsivity.”

Bradshaw On: The Family: A New Way of Creating Solid Self-Esteem

Alternate coping mechanisms
There are oodles of alternate coping mechanisms, but habit is everything, and establishing new routines takes time. Most addicts need a lot of support when attempting to switch from “using” to using alternate coping mechanisms, such as meditation, journaling, prayer, exercise, walking, deep breathing exercises, yoga, tai chi, seeking out a fellow recovering addict, or attending a support group.

Using healthy coping mechanisms can calm one down enough to identify feelings, which is the first step in learning how to process them. Learning how to feel one’s feelings takes time too. Once an addicts stops using and begins owning their actions, they become open to spiritual healing, self-knowledge, maturity, and grit.

Support systems
Establishing support systems helps recovering addicts too. The Internet makes it easy to find meet-ups, churches, temples, support groups, and more. And there’s always volunteering. You might not get paid to volunteer, but while volunteering, you don’t have a chance to spend money either!

Seriously, volunteering can enable you to:

  • Shift your focus away from yourself
  • Help out your community
  • Get involved in a cause you are passionate about
  • Help you polish skills, such as graphic design, professional writing, event planning, videography, and fund raising
  • Network

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Nine surprising reasons U.S. healthcare costs the most, yet delivers the least overall (part two)

Part one discusses three reasons for our costly, yet ineffective healthcare system that have little to do with legislation: our malpractice system, our culture of unhealth, and poor nutrition that creates chronic inflammation within our cells, which, in turn, manifests chronic diseases. Part two discusses the consequence for treatment that is doled out, the lack of functional medicine, and that it is nearly impossible to comparison shop for medical procedures.

Keep them coming back for treatment
Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal, author of An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back lists 10 “economic rules of the dysfunctional medical market” in her book. Her rule number two is, “A lifetime of treatment is preferable to a cure.”

During an interview on NPR, Rosenthal, while referring to rule number two, said, “One expert in the book joked to me … that if we relied on the current medical market to deal with polio, we would never have a polio vaccine. Instead we would have iron lungs in seven colors with iPhone apps.” (How U.S. Healthcare Became Big Business, NPR, Fresh Air, Terry Gross, April 10, 2017).

Functional medicine
Functional medicine assesses everything a patient does in order to get the patient and doctor working together to address the root causes of illness and needed lifestyle modifications.

This functional, integrative, approach worked for me. I have a chronic health condition that was made much, much worse courtesy of ineffective treatment — I was hospitalized eight times between the ages of 18 and 26. I have since reached middle age without a trip back to the hospital save for two trips to the maternity ward.

What changed? I learned how to take care of myself. This took lots of research, including identifying triggers and a number of lifestyle accommodations, such as keeping my blood sugar steady, letting go of crash diets, and exercising nearly every day.

Change is tough. Most people don’t significantly change their routines without a lot of support. Health coaches can help patients trade their unhealthy habits for healthy ones.

Nearly impossible to compare prices
Story after story abounds of patients futilely attempting to research prices for necessary surgery or medical equipment in the U.S. The Wall Street Journal reports that it is getting a tad better (How to Research Health Care Prices, guides.wsj.com ). However, the trickier the research at hand, the longer it takes, and most consumers are becoming more and more time challenged by workplace, commuting, educational, fund raising, and other demands.

(end of part two of three parts)

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