Tag Archives: Deadly Crash

Did Lakeisha Holloway temporarily “lose her mind”?

Lakeisha Holloway lost access to her judgment the moment she decided to shelter her three-year-old daughter overnight in an automobile parked on the streets of Las Vegas. Whatever condition Ms. Holloway’s thought processes were in before her “vacation” in Las Vegas, spending several days attempting to care for herself, let alone a three-year-old, from a car (minus a bathroom, kitchen, play area, living space, or heat) could not have improved them. Not to mention that her shelter-on-wheels was being constantly asked to move.

During the days Ms. Holloway and her daughter were living out of an automobile, did any of the hotel staffers who chased the two of them off their employer’s property refer this homeless mother with her toddler in tow to a shelter or call the police? The police would have referred Ms. Holloway to mental health professionals who would have evaluated her, and a tragedy most likely would have been averted.

Words cannot express how tragic it is that a mother of three lost her life while simply taking a walk.

What is mental illness, but the vulnerability to impaired judgment that is not due to the influence of mind-altering substances? What is mental illness, but a brain disorder? If your brain is not functioning properly, who do you become?

According to those who knew Ms. Holloway well, on Sunday, December 20, Ms. Holloway became someone other than herself. Ms. Holloway’s cousin and former co-workers have attested to her character in various news reports. They describe a grateful, loving, spiritual, resilient young woman who loved working for the forestry service.

If Ms. Holloway had brain cancer or had her blood sugar slipped perilously out of control to the extent that it could have impaired her judgment and behavior, would societal wrath be so strong?  Brain disorders that we call mental illness are far more complex to identify, let alone treat. There is no way to prick your finger, draw blood, dip a test strip in that drop of blood, and get a reading that represents the state of your judgment.

I do not believe that Ms. Holloway acted intentionally, that she intended to harm pedestrians. I think she lost her temper, and, in her diminished capacity that was a great departure from her true character, threw a tantrum. Judging from witnesses, she appeared to be in such an impaired state that, at that time, she was possibly delusional or in a dissociative state — not present.

Although at 24, Ms. Holloway is legally an adult, she is still a young adult with a brain not quite fully developed. The development of the prefrontal cortex, the section of the brain that is responsible for judgment, impulsivity, and other executive function is now considered complete at 25.

There might not have been any way to predict that the prefrontal cortex of this vibrant young mother would lose function to the degree that her judgment would become grossly impaired, the filter to counter her anger would disappear, and impulsivity would take over and allow her to vent her frustration and anger with what had become her prison, her car. Does an angry three-year-old understand the consequences of driving a car on a sidewalk? Someone whose brain has become disordered lacks the ability to reason just as a three-year-old lacks that ability.

I pray that Ms. Holloway has access to spiritual guidance as well as an integrative psychiatrist who can help her restore her shattered spirit and teach her how to take care of herself so that she never experiences another break from reality. Brains are our most complex organ, and those who succeed in overcoming their brain disorders learn many strategies to monitor brain function such as tracking their sleep and moods and other aspects of health that influence brain function.

Lakeisha Holloway was a productive member of society once, and she can be again. Her little girl must miss her mommy a lot.

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Filed under Mental Health and Addiction